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Lecture RRI and genome editing for congenital deafness – Stevienna de Saille at KULeuven

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Lecture RRI and genome editing for congenital deafness – Stevienna de Saille at KULeuven

On June 22 Stevienna de Saille (Research Fellow in the Institute for the Study of the Human at the University of Sheffield, UK) will give a lecture on ‘Applying ‘Responsible Research and Innovation’ to genome editing for congenital deafness: questions and conundrums’.   ABSTRACT Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) is a policy framework advocating attention to the development of new technologies, particularly to the potentially unequal social distribution of benefits, burdens and risk, and to engaging the public in the governance of research and innovation. Although not always calling itself RRI, these precepts have formed the basis of a global debate about the social and ethical implications of editing the human genome, particularly for making changes which can be passed to future generations. However, despite a trajectory of research focused on treating genetic deafness, the Deaf (i.e. sign-using) community has so far been largely excluded from these discussions. In this seminar I will discuss the early stages of a project researching how the Deaf community’s experience with the use of cochlear implants (CIs) may (or may not) help to develop an RRI-inflected discussion about the unequal distribution of benefits and risks of genetic editing for deafness, particularly on a community which sees itself as a linguistic minority rather than a disabled population. The project aims to develop its questions in close collaboration with Deaf community groups in Belgium, considering how the specific history of CIs in this country may inform perspectives on genome editing, and facilitating the inclusion of Deaf perspectives in the wider debate around governance of genome editing in Europe. Its second aim is to help develop Deaf community discussion of biomedical innovation using techniques which are projected to enable precise ‘editing’ of the genome, potentially at the embryonic stage, to ‘cure’ genetic deafness.   –        11h00 – 13h00 –        Meeting Room Sociology 02.163 (Faculty of Social Sciences, Parkstraat 45, Leuven)   Details about the guest lecture can be found on our website: http://soc.kuleuven.be/ceso/life-sciences-society-lab   Open to everyone! Please confirm your attendance by email: Annet Wauters...

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CFA Behaviour-based personalisation in contemporary insurance markets – ‘Risk and the Insurance Business in History’-conference 2019

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CFA Behaviour-based personalisation in contemporary insurance markets – ‘Risk and the Insurance Business in History’-conference 2019

Call for Abstracts: Behaviour-based personalisation in contemporary insurance markets This session is part of the ‘Risk and the Insurance Business in History’-conference, taking place in Seville (Spain), from June 11th to June 14th 2019 (more info on the conference: http://www.riskandtheinsurancebusiness.com/). Deadline of submission: June 30th 2018 Proposals should include names and affiliations of the author/s; title and abstract. The definite list of accepted papers will be announced on September 30th 2018. (http://www.riskandtheinsurancebusiness.com/call-for-papers/) Session info: http://www.riskandtheinsurancebusiness.com/session-13-behaviour-based-personalisation-in-contemporary-insurance-markets/   Organizers Gert Meyers (Life Sciences & Society Lab, Centre for Sociological Research, KU Leuven) Ine Van Hoyweghen (Life Sciences & Society Lab, Centre for Sociological Research, KU Leuven) Liz McFall (Faculty of Arts & Social Science, Open University) Hugo Jeanningros (Groupe d’Etude des méthodes de l’Analyse Sociologique, Université Paris-Sorbonne)   Abstract Big Data is promising a revolution in different societal spheres such as security, health and (online) shopping (Mayer-Schönberger & Cukier, 2013). Massive amounts of personal data (genetic information, shared information from wearable devices, internet behaviour information) will become manageable in real-time now or in the near future. In the field of insurance, the best known example of Big Data is usage-based car insurance (Car UBI). Big Data – in the form of predictive modelling, Machine Learning (ML), Artificial Intelligence (AI), Internet of Things (IoT), and other technologies that enable the treatment of ‘personalised data’ – is considered to be a ‘disruptive technology’ (FINEOS, 2014; McKinsey Global Institute, 2013), altering the stabilised insurance practices of risk selection through the introduction of predictive data and modelling and the personalisation of risk. Hypes and fears of the ‘disruptive’ potentials of predictive modelling in insurance abound. Big Data comes with the promise of reducing insurance costs, more accurate pricing and personalising risk, to support healthy lifestyles, make clients accountable, and/or secure their responsible behaviour celebrating predictive modelling solutions as the ‘new way to be smart’ (Ayres, 2007) or as a desirable shift because ‘the ongoing trends towards real-time risk assessment, product and process simplification and automation could accelerate moves towards more radical business models in insurance’ (Swiss Re 2017, 25). Others fear that predictive data and modelling in insurance would increase inequality and discrimination (O’Neil, 2016), resulting in ‘social sorting’ (Minty, 2014), ‘the end of solidarity’ that characterises European insurance markets (Gayant, 2015) as well as the end of insurance-‘as-we-know-it’ (Llull, 2016). Never mind their respective intuitive merits, such claims on hypes and fears popularise the idea of big data as a paradigm shift. As such, they often neglect the way predictive data and modelling concretely affect, transform, disrupt or reinforce existing practices. In this session, we want to pay attention to contemporary insurance practices, and more specifically to experimental practices of behaviour-based personalisation. Our hypothesis is that behaviour-based personalisation, as a process driving the domain of insurance, does not simply increase the amount of available data and optimise the processes it is applied to, but also changes our ways of knowing, our ways of social ordering and the way we make decisions (Ewald 1991, 2012, Baker 2002, Meyers & Van Hoyweghen 2017). The practices of traditional insurance are being challenged by new forms and uses of data. This session will accept contributions presenting research on the challenges surrounding behaviour-based personalisation in insurance, triggered by, but not restricted to, the following general question: how does behaviour-based...

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CfP 2018 Ricomet Conference Antwerp

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CfP 2018 Ricomet Conference Antwerp

The fourth RICOMET conference on Social Science and Humanities (SSH) in Ionising Radiation Research takes place in Antwerp, Belgium 13th to 15th of June 2018. This edition is scientifically oriented towards supporting SSH researchers to  identify good research  practices, address challenges in multidisciplinary research, review and suggest methods and build towards a common understanding of SSH research related to ionizing radiation. The conference will use a discussion approach and encourage participants to engage in dialogue. For more information and to submit a paper:...

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Het enorme potentieel van burgerwetenschap – De Standaard 05/03/2018

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Het enorme potentieel van burgerwetenschap – De Standaard 05/03/2018

Het enorme potentieel van burgerwetenschap Burgerwetenschap verdient een vaste plaats in het Vlaamse wetenschaps- en innovatiebeleid, schrijven drie academici. Citizen science kan maatschappelijke invloed uitoefenen omdat het vaak buiten de gangbare paden treedt. Michiel van Oudheusden, Gert Verschraegen, Ine Van Hoyweghen Wie? Onderzoekers verbonden aan het Studiecentrum Kernenergie, de KU Leuven en Universiteit Antwerpen. Wat? Citizen science gaat niet alleen over wetenschap maar ook over burgerschap en democratie....

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Call for Papers: EASST Conference 2018 @ Lancaster; 4S Conference 2018 @ Sydney; STS Italy Conference 2018 @ Padova

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Call for Papers: EASST Conference 2018 @ Lancaster; 4S Conference 2018 @ Sydney; STS Italy Conference 2018 @ Padova

Call for Papers: EASST Conference 2018 @ Lancaster; 4S Conference 2018 @ Sydney; STS Italy Conference 2018 @ Padova   CfP: “Technopolitics of integration. Charting imaginaries of innovation in the European Union” Abstract Ever increasingly since the launch of the Lisbon Agenda at the turn of the millennium, the European Union has targeted the acceleration of scientific and technological innovation as a key policy objective, envisaging the consolidation of the Union as dependent upon its “power to innovate” (European Commission 2013). Emphasized as one of the privileged means to steer the EU out of its current economic and political gridlock, while being heralded as conducive to nothing less than a “new Renaissance” (European Commission 2012), the acceleration of innovation has come to underpin the promise of the European project and to define the imaginary around which the fragile EU polity is envisaged to coalesce. In this panel, we welcome empirical and conceptual contributions aimed at making sense and critically examining the mobilization of innovation visions and policies towards the socio–political consolidation of the EU and its transnational exercise of political, economic and cultural power. Specifically, some questions that the panel seeks to probe include: which vision of the EU do innovation policies encode and perform? How is agency (re)distributed among different actors groups, and how are state-market-science relations and public-private boundaries being redefined, in EU innovation policies? Which actors groups are empowered to speak and act in the name of accelerating innovation, and whose voices are disenfranchised? What are the emerging tensions and frictions between the ideal of competitiveness enshrined in innovation programs, and those of democratic accountability and social justice? How do specific visions of innovation depend upon, mobilize and/or reinforce existing socio-political inequalities?   STS Italy: June 14 – 16, 2018 @ Padova Convenors: Luca Marelli, KU Leuven, luca.marelli@ieo.it; Ine Van Hoyweghen, KU Leuven, ine.vanhoyweghen@kuleuven.be; Gert Verschraegen, University of Antwerp, gert.verschraegen@uantwerpen.be Deadline abstract submission: February 10, 2018   EASST: July 25 – 28, 2018 @ Lancaster Convenors: Jim Dratwa, European Commission and Woodrow Wilson Center; Luca Marelli, KU Leuven, luca.marelli@ieo.it; Ine Van Hoyweghen, KU Leuven, ine.vanhoyweghen@kuleuven.be Deadline abstract submission: February 14, 2018   4S: August 29 – September 1, 2018 @ Sydney Convenors: Luca Marelli, KU Leuven, luca.marelli@ieo.it; Giuseppe Testa, European Institute of Oncology and University of Milan, giuseppe.testa@ieo.it; Ine Van Hoyweghen, KU Leuven, ine.vanhoyweghen@kuleuven.be Deadline abstract submission: February 1, 2018   CfP: “Citizen science from below and above” Abstract Bottom-up citizen science initiatives engage artists, students, hackers, journalists, entrepreneurs, and other “non-scientists” in techno-scientific activities, such as biohacking, online computer/video gaming, pollution monitoring, and wildlife species counting, among many others. As many of these initiatives serve public purposes (e.g., educational goals) and emanate within democratic and participatory countercultures (e.g., the open science movement), they challenge the authority of orthodox science. In its “purest” form, citizen science emerges as a reaction against industry, institutional science, and science policymaking, in so far as these institutes are seen to inhibit open knowledge sharing. On the other hand, some citizen scientists explicitly and deliberately link up with entrepreneurial and commercial endeavors. These dual dynamics unfold in a policy context that is conducive to the institutionalization of citizen science, as policy makers (in Europe and on the level of member states) hail citizen science as a means of “setting up future...

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2018 Annual S.NET Meeting – CALL for PAPERS

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2018 Annual S.NET Meeting  – CALL for PAPERS

The 10th annual S.NET meeting will take place June 25-27, 2018 at the Faculty of Arts and Social Science, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. The theme is Anticipatory Technologies: Data and Disorientation. Invitation S.NET invites contributions to the tenth annual meeting of The Society for the Study of New and Emerging Technologies (S.NET), to be held at Maastricht University, the Netherlands, on June 25-27 2018. The three-day conference will assemble scholars, practitioners and policy makers from around the world interested in the development and implications of emerging technologies.   About S.NET S.NET is an international association that promotes intellectual exchange and critical inquiry about the advancement of new and emerging technologies in society. The aim of the association is to advance critical reflection from various perspectives on developments in a broad range of new and emerging fields, including, but not limited to, nanoscale science and engineering, biotechnology, synthetic biology, cognitive science, ICT and Big Data, and geo-engineering. Current S.NET board members are: Michael Bennett (chair), Marianne Boenink, Ana Delgado, Clare Shelley-Egan, Chris Toumey, Poonam Pandey, Christopher Coenen, Colin Milburn, Kornelia Konrad, Nora Vaage, Maria Belen Albornoz, and Ryan LaBar.   Conference Theme: Anticipatory technologies – data and disorientation Any effort on new and emerging technologies unavoidably deals with the non-existing and the speculative. The future is permanently mobilized to promote decisions and policies regarding the science, technology and society nexus. Anticipatory technologies like predictive policing and preventive medicine promise to give us better epistemic access and practical control over the future. The basic irony, however, is that anticipatory technologies do not only increase data but also disorientation. Is the disorientation vis-á-vis the future in spite of the astonishing growth of data, or can it be a result of that growth? Does the growing control over future events in terms of risk make people more acutely aware of what they don’t control? Contributions are invited that explore existing ways in which the future is mobilized, technologically mediated, and economically exploited; that map the manifold ways it is contested both in discourse and in action; and that reflect on the extent to which new technologies ironically undermine our faith in the future. Key note speakers Prof Cyrus Mody is an historian of recent science and technology and has published on the history of nanotechnology and micro-electronics.  He studies the commercialization of academic research, countercultural science and technology, and the longue durée of responsible research and innovation. He worked at Rice University, Texas, the NSF Center for Nanotechnology in Society and now has a chair at Maastricht University. Prof Marjolein van Asselt has a strong profile on governance, risk and uncertainty in both academic and policy circles. Currently she is member of the Dutch Safety Board and was a member of the Scientific Council for Government Policy for many years. She has a Governance chair at Maastricht University. Third key note speaker to be announced.   Themes, topics and conference strands for the 10th Annual Meeting S.NET encompasses communities, perspectives, and methodologies from across the social sciences, humanities and natural sciences, and welcomes contributions from technology developers and other practitioners. The program committee invites contributions from the full breadth of disciplines, methodologies, and perspectives, as well as from applied, participatory, and practical approaches to studying these emerging fields. Regionally or internationally comparative perspectives are...

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Call for projects on Citizen Science (in Dutch)

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Call for projects on Citizen Science (in Dutch)

Het Departement Economie, Wetenschap & Innovatie van de Vlaamse Overheid heeft een oproep gelanceerd naar projecten rond Citizen Science. Minister Muyters: “De tijd dat wetenschap en onderzoek enkel achter de gesloten deuren van het labo plaatsvindt, is voorbij. Enthousiaste vrijwilligers helpen onderzoekers door mee na te denken, waarnemingen te doen, data te verzamelen…“ De steun aan de projecten heeft als doel de deelname van burgers, zonder onderscheid in geslacht, afkomst, opleidingsniveau, leeftijd, … aan onderzoek te promoten. In de projecten worden de burgers aangemoedigd om bij te dragen aan het genereren van onderzoeksresultaten en inzichten op basis van hun expertise, nieuwsgierigheid en bereidwilligheid om deel te nemen, en dit zonder afbreuk te doen aan de excellentie van het onderzoek. Van de projecten wordt in het bijzonder verwacht dat ze de kloof tussen onderzoekers en burgers en de maatschappij in het algemeen verkleinen met bijzondere aandacht voor de uitdagingen op het vlak van STEM-studie- en beroepskeuze. Ieder project dient dan ook bijzondere aandacht te besteden aan laagdrempelige en intensieve communicatie over de inhoud, voortgang en resultaten van het project. De projecten volgen de open data principes en stellen de gegevens ook ter beschikking van andere onderzoekers (eventueel na een af te spreken periode). De uiterste indiendatum is 15 maart 2018. Voor meer informatie, klik hier....

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CICS lecture series at Ghent University

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CICS lecture series at Ghent University

The CICS is an international lecture series organized by the Centre for Social Theory of the department of sociology at Ghent University, with the support of the Internationalisation@Home fund of the faculty of political and social science. The CICS welcomes three young and rising international scholars who will speak about their current work in the field of citizenship and participation. Friday 13 October, 10:00-11:30: ‘volunteerism on demand’, Ane Grubb (Aalborg University Copenhagen, DNK) Friday 10 November, 13:00-14:30: ‘donor perspectives on local and global blood and plasma use’, Zainab Afshan Sheikh (Copenhagen University, DNK) Friday 24 November, 13:00-14:30: ‘social bonds, intersectionality and relational sociology’, Greti-Iulia Ivana (Uppsala University, SVE) All lectures take place in Filmplateau, Paddenhoek 3 at Campus AULA of Ghent University, admission is free and open to all interested audiences. Alongside these public lectures, all three scholars will go into a more in-depth exchange of thought about their work during an informal research seminar that is open to all interested researchers and students. To register for this event, please send an email to Nathan Wittock (Nathan.Wittock@UGent.be). Ane Grubb: Thursday 12 October, 17:30-19:00 Zainab Afshan Sheikh: Friday 10 November, 9:30-11:00 Greti-Iulia Ivana: Thursday 23 November, 13:30-15:00 These seminars will take place in the meeting room on the first floor of the Communication Science department (Korte Meer...

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WTMC Workshop (Re)inventing Responsibility and Innovation

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WTMC Workshop (Re)inventing Responsibility and Innovation

18-20 December 2017 Conference centre Soeterbeeck, Deursen-Dennenburg (previously Ravenstein), the Netherlands In this WTMC Workshop, we look at innovation in its social context, as well as current perspectives on how innovation can and should be made ‘responsible’. We will discuss some of the standard views of innovation, and see how research from innovation studies and innovation management provide handles to think through innovation, and to manage it in specific ways. STIS (Science, Technology and Innovation Studies) has intensively engaged with this new discourse of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI). How is RRI new – if at all – given the historical engagement of STIS with issues of responsibility and normativity? We will also look at how STIS scholars critically engage with some of the field’s built-in assumptions. What tends to be assumed under ‘innovation’, and what kinds of phenomena does that tend to make invisible – think of social innovation, resistance, recycling, repair and maintenance? What normativities are built into the framework of RRI – is innovation always ‘good’, and should we always have more innovation? What is meant by ‘responsible’, and for whom? Who are assumed to be the key actors in innovation? How can we enrol actors who are often excluded from innovation discourses and processes, such as users, and more particularly users in the ‘Global South’? And how can we conceptualize non-use and resistance? This workshop is aimed at PhD students across STIS. An explicit background in innovation studies is not required. Confirmed speakers include: Lotte Asveld, Stefan Kuhlmann and Annapurna Mamidipudi. The registration form for this workshop is now available here. Please register by 31 October 2017!   Costs for WTMC members: meals 10 EUR /day. Costs for everyone else: 695 EUR, including fee, accommodation and meals. If you have any content-related questions regarding this workshop, please feel free to contact Govert Valkenburg: g.valkenburg@cwts.leidenuniv.nl or Bernike Pasveer: b.pasveer@maastrichtuniversity.nl For practical questions please contact Elize Schiweck:...

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International Workshop: (Un)taming Citizen Science – 4/12/2017 – KU Leuven

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International Workshop: (Un)taming Citizen Science – 4/12/2017 – KU Leuven

Workshop outline We are presently witnessing a global explosion of citizen science initiatives covering a wide range of topics, from counting hummingbirds to actively researching new medical treatments, to the use of smartphones to measuring radioactivity in the environment. European policymakers and societal stakeholders hail citizen science as a means of (re)building trust in science, which may in turn lead to “more democratic research based on evidence and informed decision-making” and more responsible innovation (Sanz et al. 2014). Others see it as a means of enabling citizens to become researchers, advocates, or watchdogs of science, or to become their own sensors and create their own expertise and communities, distinct from established organizations and practices. In this workshop, we explore these and related issues through the notion of ‘(un)taming,’ which refers to the mutual adjustment of technology and the social, and links to ‘domestication’ and domestication theory in science and technology studies (Latour, 1987; Callon, 1986; Williams et al. 2004). It allows us to highlight how citizen science is incorporated into science and other subsystems of society through a wide array of interrelated and unconnected mechanisms, programs and procedures, such as research and development processes, the fabrication of new technologies and systems (e.g. DIY technologies), science policy making, educational activities, science journalism, and contemporary art forms, among others. As these processes elicit both support and controversy, they evoke several significant questions as to how citizen science is changing the confines of science and citizenship in contemporary society: Who and what is citizen science (not) for? How is citizen science tamed, and why? Which citizen science forms are amenable to taming, which forms are not? How is citizen science made public or politicized? How is it professionalized? How is it promoted, and to what effects? How do citizen scientists engage with the above questions? How will citizen science fare in the years ahead?   References Callon, M. 1986. “Some elements of a sociology of translation: domestication of the scallops and the fishermen of St. Brieuc Bay”. In Power, action, and belief, Edited by: Law, J. 196–233. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. Latour, B. 1987. Science in action: how to follow scientists and engineers through society. Milton Keynes: Open University Press. Sanz, F.S. et al. 2014. EU White Paper on Citizen Science for Europe (White Paper); http://socientize.eu/sites/default/files/white-paper.pdf Williams, R., Stewart, J, Slack, R. (2004). Social Learning in Technological Innovation, Cheltenham, Edward Elgar. Registration Participation is free of charge but registration is required before 15 November. If you would like to join us in Leuven on 4 December, send an email confirming your registration to Michiel Van Oudheusden: michiel.vanoudheusden@kuleuven.be Workshop venue Collegium Veteranorum (COVE) 02.10 Sint-Michielsstraat 2-4 3000 Leuven Building number: 109-20 How to get there: https://www.kuleuven.be/kulag/en/gebouw/109-20 Program 10.00-10.30 – (Un)taming citizen science, Ine Van Hoyweghen (KU Leuven) and Michiel Van Oudheusden (KU Leuven, SCK-CEN) 10.30-11.15 – Engaging citizens in European research and innovation activities, Philippe Galiay (DG Research and Innovation, European Commission) 11.15-12.00 – Citizen science and its promotion at the European Commission level, Hadrien Macq (Université de Liège) and Elise Tancoigne (Université de Genève) 12.00-13.30 – Lunch 13.30-14.15 – Citizen Science as Communication in Japan, Yasuhito Abe (Doshisha University) 14.15-15.00 – Citizen science after Fukushima: an opportunity to learn, Joke Kenens (KU Leuven, SCK-CEN) 15.00-15.30 – Coffee break 15.30-16.15 – Popularizing citizen...

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